Of mice and men essay prompts

George and Lennie live in a hopeless present but they somehow try to keep a foot in an idealized future. They dream of one day running their own ranch, safe and answerable to no one. Others such as Curley's wife dreams of being a movie star, Crooks, of hoeing his own patch and Candy's 'couple of acres'.The dream ends with the death of Lennie. George awakens to the realisation that the earthly paradise himself and Lennie dreamed of is illusionary. At the end of the novel, George knows in his bones that for people like himself and Lennie there is no real hope of a better life. It is a stark and bitter knowledge. There is no doubt that Steinbeck certainly knew about Social Darwinism and the' survival of the fittest'. In this world the ruthless dominate the weak and the strong survive to live another day. There is a Social Darwinist streak in the novel, the weak are dispensed with, and there is no justice for them. A similar ruthlessness can also be seen in Jack London's The Sea Wolf. Both novels portray a hellish existence where cruelty and viciousness reign.

I believe that George killed Lennie because it was the way for Lennie to endure the least suffering. Curley was talking about shooting him in the stomach with a shotgun, quite a painful death. George thought that there was no way for them to escape them, and so it was almost already decided that Lennie would die. He could be shot in the belly, lynched, or painlessly shot in the back of the head. That was the way George thought was best for his best friend, and so he shot him. We know that he was not trying to kill him like the rest of the ranch-hands, because he killed Curley's wife, for he told Lennie the story of the farm that they would get, so that Lennie would be in a good place when he died, not scared or in pain. George did a hard thing, although it was the right thing. If I was in this situation I hope that I could be the friend George was and end Lennie's life mercifully. 

Going back to the “friendship” part of this discussion, I guess we all could say that friendship is something different to all of us. In “Mice and Men,” friendship portrays the reason, and necessity of sacrifices. George continuously sacrifices for Lennie. Lennie is a complete burden for George. However, that doesn’t stop George from looking after Lennie. On the other hand, we can also see it in a way where friendship is becoming a burden to George. At times, in the book we see that George is sick of Lennie, and he wishes to leave him behind. But he becomes accustomed to the belief that he needs to look after Lennie, and it’s his duty. Either way, George continuously sacrifices his time, and his peace for Lennie’s benefit, and that is friendship.
However, often friendship starts only because of gains. If both sides can earn something beneficial, friendship starts. The question is how true that friendship is. In MIce and Men, friend is all about devotion. But in real life, each of us approach friendship in a different way.
In true life, money, power and fame often comes in the way of friendship. We run for establishments more than running to find a true friend. Trust is often a rare element to find in a friendship of real life. The older we get, often, the weaker friendship becomes. People tend to focus on nothing but themselves. However, for those, who still manage to find good friends create a relationship like George and Lennie. The bond is unbreakable.

In July, the Senate rejected the bonus 62 to 18. Most of the protesters went home, aided by Hoover's offer of free passage on the rails. Ten thousand remained behind, among them a hard core of Communists and other organizers. On the morning of July 28, forty protesters tried to reclaim an evacuated building in downtown Washington scheduled for demolition. The city's police chief, Pellham Glassford, sympathetic to the marchers, was knocked down by a brick. Glassford's assistant suffered a fractured skull. When rushed by a crowd, two other policemen opened fire. Two of the marchers were killed.
Source
Bud Fields and his family. Alabama. 1935 or 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Squatter's Camp, Route 70, Arkansas, October, 1935.
Photographer: Ben Shahn
Source
Philipinos cutting lettuce, Salinas, California, 1935. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
In order to maximize their ability to exploit farm workers, California employers recruited from China, Japan, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Mexico, the American south, and Europe.
Source
Roadside stand near Birmingham, Alabama, 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Farmer and sons, dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936. Photographer: Arthur Rothstein.
The drought that helped cripple agriculture in the Great Depression was the worst in the climatological history of the country. By 1934 it had dessicated the Great Plains, from North Dakota to Texas, from the Mississippi River Valley to the Rockies. Vast dust storms swept the region.
Source
Migrant pea pickers camp in the rain. California, February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
In one of the largest pea camps in California. February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
The photograph that has become known as "Migrant Mother" is one of a series of photographs that Dorothea Lange made in February or March of 1936 in Nipomo, California. Lange was concluding a month's trip photographing migratory farm labor around the state for what was then the Resettlement Administration. In 1960, Lange gave this account of the experience:  I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean- to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it. (From: Popular Photography , Feb. 1960).
Source

The second appearance is in Crook’s room, which is separated from the other bunk houses. Lennie, Crooks, and Candy are all in Crooks room. Curley’s wife appears in the doorway, claiming that she is looking for Curley and complaining that she just wants someone to talk to because she is very lonely. Candy tells her that she has a husband and she should not be fooling around with other men. Once again Candy is talking about his feelings about Curley’s wife, stating in a discreet way that she is a tramp. She asks what happened to Curley’s hand because she noticed that it was broken. Candy tells her that Curley had an accident with a machine, but she doesn’t believe him. As she was leaving, she asks Lennie why he has the bruises on his face, and he said that Curley

Of mice and men essay prompts

of mice and men essay prompts

In July, the Senate rejected the bonus 62 to 18. Most of the protesters went home, aided by Hoover's offer of free passage on the rails. Ten thousand remained behind, among them a hard core of Communists and other organizers. On the morning of July 28, forty protesters tried to reclaim an evacuated building in downtown Washington scheduled for demolition. The city's police chief, Pellham Glassford, sympathetic to the marchers, was knocked down by a brick. Glassford's assistant suffered a fractured skull. When rushed by a crowd, two other policemen opened fire. Two of the marchers were killed.
Source
Bud Fields and his family. Alabama. 1935 or 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Squatter's Camp, Route 70, Arkansas, October, 1935.
Photographer: Ben Shahn
Source
Philipinos cutting lettuce, Salinas, California, 1935. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
In order to maximize their ability to exploit farm workers, California employers recruited from China, Japan, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Mexico, the American south, and Europe.
Source
Roadside stand near Birmingham, Alabama, 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Farmer and sons, dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936. Photographer: Arthur Rothstein.
The drought that helped cripple agriculture in the Great Depression was the worst in the climatological history of the country. By 1934 it had dessicated the Great Plains, from North Dakota to Texas, from the Mississippi River Valley to the Rockies. Vast dust storms swept the region.
Source
Migrant pea pickers camp in the rain. California, February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
In one of the largest pea camps in California. February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
The photograph that has become known as "Migrant Mother" is one of a series of photographs that Dorothea Lange made in February or March of 1936 in Nipomo, California. Lange was concluding a month's trip photographing migratory farm labor around the state for what was then the Resettlement Administration. In 1960, Lange gave this account of the experience:  I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean- to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it. (From: Popular Photography , Feb. 1960).
Source

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