Authorial intent essays

The meaning of a text is not produced solely by an author; it is a complex collaboration between author, text and reader. Shakespeare did not give 'Romeo and Juliet' meaning, meaning was created through the text and performance of the play and by the viewer creating their own personal opinions about it. Shakespeare may have been the 'origin' behind 'Romeo and Juliet' but there are many different sources that could have been seen to be used, questioning the originality of the play. The essential meaning of a piece of literature depends on the impression it has made on the reader, the writers passions and tastes do not come into it. Meaning is a collaboration of all these different factors, it cannot be gathered purely from just the author because there may have been no authorial intent behind that text and literature is all about your own personal opinion and where you 'take' that text in your mind. Barthes makes an important point saying, 'a text's unity lies not in its origins [...] but in its destination,' (pp. 142-48) meaning that it all comes down to the reader and society, a piece of texts origins are unimportant.

Classification looks at a diverse group of objects (a heterogeneous group) and looks for similarities. The writer then creates categories based on those similarities and labels each category. Humor is often, but not always, the intent of writing a classification essay. For example, a student may choose to write an essay classifying students at her school. Such categories may include any of the following: the overachievers, the techies, the jocks, and the club rats. The writer would describe each of these categories in a paragraph, using humorous language and giving examples.

Michel Foucault also addressed the question of the author in critical interpretation. In his 1969 essay " What is an Author? ", he developed the idea of " author function " to explain the author as a classifying principle within a particular discursive formation. Foucault did not mention Barthes in his essay but its analysis has been seen as a challenge to Barthes' depiction of a historical progression that will liberate the reader from domination by the author. Jacques Derrida paid ironic homage to Barthes's "The Death of the Author" in his essay "The Deaths of Roland Barthes". [4]

This too is represented in the strand of Biblical imagery throughout the tale. It is rather obvious, perhaps, to see May’s infidelity with Damien (whose very name, some critics argue, means “snake”) as a version of Eve’s transgression with the snake – both, indeed, take place in a beautiful garden, though the Bible’s Adam does not share the physical disgust of January. Characteristic of the Merchant’s apparent bitterness, perhaps, is the remark which follows January’s really rather beautiful pastiche (calling May to awake and come into the garden) of the Song of Songs: it refers to them in a blunt, dismissive phrase as “olde, lewed words”. In this tale, beautiful women are really venomous, malicious tricksters - beautiful, lyrical poetry is really only old, obscene words.

Authorial intent essays

authorial intent essays

This too is represented in the strand of Biblical imagery throughout the tale. It is rather obvious, perhaps, to see May’s infidelity with Damien (whose very name, some critics argue, means “snake”) as a version of Eve’s transgression with the snake – both, indeed, take place in a beautiful garden, though the Bible’s Adam does not share the physical disgust of January. Characteristic of the Merchant’s apparent bitterness, perhaps, is the remark which follows January’s really rather beautiful pastiche (calling May to awake and come into the garden) of the Song of Songs: it refers to them in a blunt, dismissive phrase as “olde, lewed words”. In this tale, beautiful women are really venomous, malicious tricksters - beautiful, lyrical poetry is really only old, obscene words.

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